mtv lifer writing a Joss Whedon biography to come out in 2014.
i watch a lot of television. a lot.
and i talk about fandom and television in general a lot.
when not slacking off, i'm rambling at PopGurls.com
(not as much lately)

I’m watching the Doctor Who premiere and cutting monkey ears out of felt. And thinking about how I want to start reading tarot cards more regularly. And If I should dye my hair tonight. 

So, in other words, I’m doing a good job of avoiding the things i need to be doing. 

Hi! I was just wondering if you were going to or already announced the winner for the giveaway for your book? Thanks!

hello! yes! i’m so sorry for the delay — i’ve been a bit swamped with my “real life” job and was working on this now. i’ll post the winners within the hour :)

You can tell a lot about a person from their music. Hit shuffle on your iPod, MP3 Player, etc. and put the first 10 songs! One rule, no skipping! Tag 10 people and pass it on!

Tagged by stillscape

Caveat: I download a lot of free mixes and compilations and I’ve only listened to a few of them. So if it’s a band/song I don’t know, I skipped it. I also skipped comedy album tracks and random audio files.
  1. Fiona Apple – Love Ridden
  2. Mariachi El Bronx — I Would Die 4 U (Prince Cover)
  3. Ani DiFranco — Untouchable Face (live)
    (whereas stillscape’s iTunes wanted you all to know about her Beatles love, mine has gone to Ani on every other song.)
  4. Doris Day — I Enjoy Being a Girl
  5. Stone Roses — She Bangs the Drums 
    (I did not recognize this at first because I fell in love with the Kelly Reverb Mix version of this over 10 years ago and completely forgot what the original song sounds like.)
  6. Mouse Rat — The Pit
  7. The Wonder Stuff — A Wish Away
  8. Jill Sobule — Supermodel
  9. Muse — Feeling Good
  10. Julian Cope — World Shut Your Mouth

(also of note: most of my music listening is the same stuff that i listened to in high school and college)

tagging, if you’re so inclined: breakthecitysky, romanticalgirl, bettiebloodshed, scullyseviltwin, princessgeorge, this-too-too-sullied-flesh, ozthecat, misterkevo, fearless-fan, tacanderson

I assume you're an awesome lady with a wide range of talents. I assume you love your friends. I assume that you care about injustice in the world and the pain of others, sometimes too much. I also assume that, should we ever meet, the nachos are on you. :)

ha! well, i AM an awesome lady.

i wouldn’t say that i have a wide range of “talents,” but i can do a lot of things. i am quite the embodiment of “jack of all trades, master of none.” 

I do love my friends! I see no point in having friends that you don’t like. And I confirm the caring, although i often feel like i’m not doing nearly enough to help and i don’t know what to do to help. 

And actually, you are correct on me getting the nachos! I don’t know if it comes from fighting my dad for the check all the time, or just being happy that i’ve reached a point in my life where i can treat other people but I like picking up the check at a restaurant. Especially when I’m with people I haven’t seen in a very long time. 

Coca Cola Achieved!

Compete and total laziness averted for one more night! (Just “mostly lazy” will reign.)

Here’s a bonus cute photo of my babies.

I *do* sit in dark movie theaters for two hours and knit, although sometimes I have to look. Depends on the pattern. And fair enough about the clothes, although I wonder if that has anything to do with how crocheting takes up way more yarn than knitting does--maybe people therefore tend to crochet less clothing in general, so there's less demand for patterns?

HA! see! you’re one of those! ;)

i think i mentioned this before — i pretty much lived in the same building as my grandparents until i was just over 4, so i spent a lot of time with them. my grandma would teach me (over and over) how to crochet a chain, and i would sit and make superlong chains. my theory is that my fingers have crocheting muscle-memory and try as i might, knitting just does work with them. i’ve taken classes and such and i just can’t get it to work. 

and now you have me interested in researching how crocheting and knitting were developed and in what areas they were most prominent. i have a bunch of 1940s doily and embellishment pattern books, all for crochet — i would guess that it was easier to do more intricate patterns that used thinner thread with a crochet hook, and much faster to knit clothing and such with thicker yarns with long knitting needles.

(i do hope you know all my mockery is in jest — i tried to get that across in my phrasing, esp the tag “knitting is dumb because i can’t do it” ;)) 

redsirion:

Pippi!

TRUFAX: When I was little I loved Pippi Longstocking and all the books SO SO MUCH that I would wear red tights on my head. (I couldn’t quite figure out how to make them stick out on the sides of my head.)

redsirion:

Pippi!

TRUFAX: When I was little I loved Pippi Longstocking and all the books SO SO MUCH that I would wear red tights on my head. (I couldn’t quite figure out how to make them stick out on the sides of my head.)

Oooh! A Giveaway!

amypop:

amypop:

Now that I can catch my breath a little, I’m going to do a giveaway for 2 copies of Joss Whedon: The Biography.

image(<—-look! I wrote a book!)

To Read Makes Our Speaking English Good:

Joss Whedon: The Biography follows his development from a creative childhood and teenager who spent years spent away from family at an elite English public school, through his early successes, which often turned into frustrating heartbreak in both television (Roseanne) and film (Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Alien: Resurrection). He took the chance to reinvent his girl hero on a baby television network, and the resulting success and confidence led him to produce four more television series, several movies and Marvel comic books. Through it all, Whedon continues to reinterpret and reinvent storytelling on his own terms.

The book includes extensive, original interviews with: Joss and his wife Kai, Nathan Fillion, Tim Minear, David Greenwalt, Anthony Stewart Head, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Tom Hiddleston, Mark Ruffalo, Clark Gregg, Chris Hemsworth, Cobie Smulders, Jeremy Renner, Samuel L. Jackson, Kevin Feige, Joe Quesada, Jeph Loeb, Drew Goddard, Marti Noxon, Jane Espenson, Andrew Stanton, Howard Gordon,Neil Patrick Harris, Rob Thomas, and many more. 

"Though Whedon’s many fans are fairly familiar with the ups and downs of his career, the many frank quotes from Whedon, his friends, family, and coworkers make Pascale’s absorbing bio a must-read." —Booklist

Joss Whedon: The Biography is an insightful, entertaining, engaging, and intimate account of the life and work of one the most talented and successful artists of our time. Writer Amy Pascale paints her portrait of Whedon adeptly, often serving not as an author, but rather a facilitator, compiling insights from a variety of sources to construct a compelling narrative spanning from Whedon’s grandparents through the modern era to his successes within the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Pascale draws upon many individuals, including Whedon himself, to give the readers a true understanding of writer and director’s motivations, creative process, struggles, humor, and personal convictions, which evolve and mature over the course of many decades and experiences. — Geek Scholars

Pascale has certainly done her homework, and has produced a great book, and it’s rare that film/TV autobiographies are this enjoyable. But just like much of Whedon’s work, it’s smart, funny and cool, and should definitely grace any geeks bedside table. — Flickering Myth

More about the book here: theamypascale.com

The Sitch (aka “rules are super simple”):

  1. Reblog this post with your favorite Whedonverse quote or moment. 
  2. Do it by Tuesday, August 12, 11:59pm ET.

That’s it! 

Reminder! And hey, the latest review I read called my book “half-acceptable!” Aren’t you even more excited to get your own free copy of a half-acceptable book? ;) 

Final reblogging reminder! 

Reblog this post with your favorite Whedonverse quote or moment by 11:59pm ET TONIGHT and you could win a copy of my book! 

Here’s one of my favorite exchanges:
Firefly “Objects in Space”

Simon: Are you Alliance?
Jubal Early: Am I a lion?
Simon: What?
Jubal Early: I don’t think of myself as a lion. You might as well though, I have a mighty roar.
Simon: I said “Alliance.”
Jubal Early: Oh, I thought…
Simon: No, I was…
Jubal Early: That’s weird.

amypop:

I’m very sad to hear about Ned Vizzini’s death. It’s a very hard time of the year — it’s not cheery and happy for everyone, especially those who are having a difficult year. Sometimes the spiral down gets going so fast it’s hard to stop it.

I was moved by this tribute until I got to this line: "As I thought of that yesterday, and wondered how somebody so selfless could commit such a selfish act…"

That made me so incredibly angry. That and “suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem” are such ignorant, pompous and trite platitudes that basically scream “I have no understanding of depression and you’re making me uncomfortable by not being happy so just get over it.” (I once unfollowed a blog immediately after she wrote the permanent solution line.)

And we wonder why people don’t talk about dealing with suicidal urges, no matter how strong. It’s hard enough to get through the day, sometimes the hour — why then try to open up to someone who will blame you for your depression and call you selfish? Or better yet, you try to talk to someone and either they tell you that they have no experience/understanding of depression, yet they know you can “get over it” and you’re not trying hard enough OR they decide to take your depression as a personal attack on them and in turn attack you in the most personal of ways. Another third option that I’ve become very familiar with recently, is that they go against the grain of therapeutic advice and forgo an actual conversation in order to have you involuntarily committed. Because nothing says “i know you’re hurting and i care about you” than sending the police after someone in pain, then washing your hands of the situation and walking away. 

People are afraid to talk about their feelings because they know that they are being vulnerable in two ways — in an emotional level and a legal level. Because opening up is hard enough, adding in the fact that you have no idea if a trusted friend will suddenly report you to the police and you will have no say in the matter makes any conversation 100x riskier. 

Did you know that as of January 2013, New York state requires psychiatrists to report any patient to the authorities if said patient discusses suicidal thoughts in any serious way? It’s no longer up to the doctor to work with the patient who has come to them seeking help — they must report them to the state and thus are held blameless for anything that happens to the patient. You know, like involuntary commitment for someone who just needed to talk. 

I’m so angry about this. And I’ve been scared into silence by the actions of some people, but not anymore. Last night, I was afraid to post a link to Andrew Solomon’s incredible and important TedTalk on Depression for fear of the repercussions. (I was blindsided last time and i don’t trust anyone anymore.) Today, seeing A FRIEND of Ned Vizzini call him selfish because he could no longer deal with the pain of this all-encompassing depression pissed me off so much that I’ve pushed past that fear. 

If you’ve read this far, I thank you. I’m by no means an expert on any of this, but through my own experience and many, many sessions with my therapist, I just ask that if you are worried about someone — reach out to them, keep trying to get them on the phone until you are having an actual conversation. Then talk. It’s okay if you don’t know what to say — say that. Just talk and get them to talk. Yes, there are severe cases but for most in the moment, they just really need someone to listen and try to understand even if you don’t. Just keep talking, keep them talking and do it for as long as you can. It won’t fix everything, but it’ll certainly help in the really hard moments when the spiral is spinning fast and they’re doing the best they can to get to the next moment where they can catch their breath.

Reblogging in light of the sad news of Robin William’s death. 

I just wanted to say again that if you have a friend that seems off, even in the smallest of ways, check in and listen. Truly listen. Imperfectly & awkwardly listen. Listen without trying to fix the situation or the person. Just be present & listen 

Oooh! A Giveaway!

amypop:

Now that I can catch my breath a little, I’m going to do a giveaway for 2 copies of Joss Whedon: The Biography.

image(<—-look! I wrote a book!)

To Read Makes Our Speaking English Good:

Joss Whedon: The Biography follows his development from a creative childhood and teenager who spent years spent away from family at an elite English public school, through his early successes, which often turned into frustrating heartbreak in both television (Roseanne) and film (Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Alien: Resurrection). He took the chance to reinvent his girl hero on a baby television network, and the resulting success and confidence led him to produce four more television series, several movies and Marvel comic books. Through it all, Whedon continues to reinterpret and reinvent storytelling on his own terms.

The book includes extensive, original interviews with: Joss and his wife Kai, Nathan Fillion, Tim Minear, David Greenwalt, Anthony Stewart Head, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Tom Hiddleston, Mark Ruffalo, Clark Gregg, Chris Hemsworth, Cobie Smulders, Jeremy Renner, Samuel L. Jackson, Kevin Feige, Joe Quesada, Jeph Loeb, Drew Goddard, Marti Noxon, Jane Espenson, Andrew Stanton, Howard Gordon,Neil Patrick Harris, Rob Thomas, and many more. 

"Though Whedon’s many fans are fairly familiar with the ups and downs of his career, the many frank quotes from Whedon, his friends, family, and coworkers make Pascale’s absorbing bio a must-read." —Booklist

Joss Whedon: The Biography is an insightful, entertaining, engaging, and intimate account of the life and work of one the most talented and successful artists of our time. Writer Amy Pascale paints her portrait of Whedon adeptly, often serving not as an author, but rather a facilitator, compiling insights from a variety of sources to construct a compelling narrative spanning from Whedon’s grandparents through the modern era to his successes within the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Pascale draws upon many individuals, including Whedon himself, to give the readers a true understanding of writer and director’s motivations, creative process, struggles, humor, and personal convictions, which evolve and mature over the course of many decades and experiences. — Geek Scholars

Pascale has certainly done her homework, and has produced a great book, and it’s rare that film/TV autobiographies are this enjoyable. But just like much of Whedon’s work, it’s smart, funny and cool, and should definitely grace any geeks bedside table. — Flickering Myth

More about the book here: theamypascale.com

The Sitch (aka “rules are super simple”):

  1. Reblog this post with your favorite Whedonverse quote or moment. 
  2. Do it by Tuesday, August 12.

That’s it! 

Reminder! And hey, the latest review I read called my book “half-acceptable!” Aren’t you even more excited to get your own free copy of a half-acceptable book? ;)