Viewing Posts tagged: television

clubgetright replied to your post “in happier news… i’ve been rewatching “The Closer.”  I so love Brenda…”

I used to love The Closer so so hard… I will definitely have to schedule a re-watch!

It really stands up so far. I’m well into S3 and there’s so many little things that I’d forgotten, and I’m really impressed at how deftly they showed Brenda’s character soften and become a leader instead of the initial dictator position she was used to holding, and expected to be, when she arrived in Priority Homicide. And I love how utterly confident she is in herself and her abilities.

princessgeorge replied to your post “in happier news… i’ve been rewatching “The Closer.”  I so love Brenda…”

I loved that relationship a whole lot too. Really great.

They’re SO SO wonderful to watch. I like Fritz so much, and how he’s both dependable and completely open with his feelings both in love and frustration/anger. And how he makes Brenda, who constantly has 80 million possibilities running through her brain as she tries to sort out which one is correct and key to solving a murder, he makes her focus on the issue at hand and continually pushes her to declare her desires and feelings when all of her training has shown her how to “win” by perceiving everything and taking herself out of the equation. 

Like I said, I’m only into season three but I’m falling in love with them all over again :)

Friday Apr 18 12am  

 
 

I’m getting dangerously close to becoming that person who watches a show (read: mainlines 6+ seasons over a couple of weeks) and becomes so madly, passionately in love with it that she demands that EVERYONE ELSE* watch it ASAP and feel all the love. 

Murdoch Mysteries, people. A Canadian crime drama set in Toronto 1895, filled with all sorts of Victorian mores and propriety. It’s delightful and charming and delivers social commentary on the times with the right levity. And because the characters are so concerned with propriety, there’s virtually no sex and i LITERALLY SQUEALED WHEN CONSTABLE CRABTREE TUCKED A PIECE OF DOCTOR GRACE’S HAIR BEHIND HER EAR AS SHE WAS EXTRACTING A MAN’S BRAIN DURING AN AUTOPSY. 

I can’t handle it, people. I can’t handle it at all.

*i have made demands on some folk. just not everyone. yet.

Monday Feb 10 12pm  6 notes

 
 

popgurlie:

Great News! USA just picked up Lennon Parham and Jessica St. Clair’s new sitcom! 

Inspired by Jessica St. Clair and Lennon Parham’s real-life friendship, Playing House will focus on mother-to-be Maggie (Parham), who asks her single and career-driven best friend, Emma (St. Clair), to return from overseas for her baby shower, unaware of what’s in store. St. Clair and Parham, last seen on NBC’s short-lived Best Friends Forever, will also serve as executive producers. — TV Guide

 
Check out our superfantastic interview we did with the ladies:

I do feel like BFF is incredibly reflective of lady best friend relationships, and how ladies talk. The “Oh, I’ve got a rash on my butt” part alone — you don’t necessarily want everyone else to hear that, but you’re going to tell your friend that because that’s the situation.
Lennon: You want to know what’s causing it, and if she has any suggestions. Maybe it’s the new mesh panties you bought on sale.
Jessica: This is a terrible piece of information to share, but I just recently went to my dermatologist and she said, “Hey, thanks for the shout-out — you know, about your butt rash. I really appreciate it.” [Laughs]
I had to show Lennon my butt rash. I didn’t know what was going on and I needed a second opinion, and I certainly wasn’t going to get my husband involved. So in our little office, I had to show it to her. That’s real.
Lennon: It was a simple solution. She just was wearing her yoga pants for too long. [laughs] She would work out and then she would let the sweat dry on her skin, but in between her butt crack it continued to be moist.
Jessica: All right, Lennon. All right.
But here’s my question: How did you, Lennon, know that this was the problem?
Lennon: Because I spend every single day with her for eight hours a day and she was always wearing yoga pants. We were trying to keep it tight, we would work out in the morning. I would change, and then she would show up at my house straight from the gym in her yoga attire.
Jessica: Mistakes were made. This is the kind of sacrifice that we made for the show and I want people to know it.

PG Interview: Lennon Parham And Jessica St. Clair Of BFF

popgurlie:

Great News! USA just picked up Lennon Parham and Jessica St. Clair’s new sitcom! 

Inspired by Jessica St. Clair and Lennon Parham’s real-life friendship, Playing House will focus on mother-to-be Maggie (Parham), who asks her single and career-driven best friend, Emma (St. Clair), to return from overseas for her baby shower, unaware of what’s in store. St. Clair and Parham, last seen on NBC’s short-lived Best Friends Forever, will also serve as executive producers. — TV Guide

 

Check out our superfantastic interview we did with the ladies:

I do feel like BFF is incredibly reflective of lady best friend relationships, and how ladies talk. The “Oh, I’ve got a rash on my butt” part alone — you don’t necessarily want everyone else to hear that, but you’re going to tell your friend that because that’s the situation.

Lennon: You want to know what’s causing it, and if she has any suggestions. Maybe it’s the new mesh panties you bought on sale.

Jessica: This is a terrible piece of information to share, but I just recently went to my dermatologist and she said, “Hey, thanks for the shout-out — you know, about your butt rash. I really appreciate it.” [Laughs]

I had to show Lennon my butt rash. I didn’t know what was going on and I needed a second opinion, and I certainly wasn’t going to get my husband involved. So in our little office, I had to show it to her. That’s real.

Lennon: It was a simple solution. She just was wearing her yoga pants for too long. [laughs] She would work out and then she would let the sweat dry on her skin, but in between her butt crack it continued to be moist.

Jessica: All right, Lennon. All right.

But here’s my question: How did you, Lennon, know that this was the problem?

Lennon: Because I spend every single day with her for eight hours a day and she was always wearing yoga pants. We were trying to keep it tight, we would work out in the morning. I would change, and then she would show up at my house straight from the gym in her yoga attire.

Jessica: Mistakes were made. This is the kind of sacrifice that we made for the show and I want people to know it.

PG Interview: Lennon Parham And Jessica St. Clair Of BFF

View HD • Posted Thursday May 16 11am  39 notes

 
 

Watch

popgurlie:

Sleepy Hollow is basically written for fantasy fans who always watch National Treasure every time it’s on.

So, as much as I kind of hate myself for it, I really want to see this.

Posted Tuesday May 14 3pm  7 notes with

 
 

Gateway Episodes: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

This article suggests that “Earshot” is the best gateway episode to introduce someone to BuffyIt’s a fantastic episode but THE GATEWAY one? I strongly disagree. You need to know these characters — especially Buffy and Jonathan — to understand the immense gravity of Jonathan’s decision and Buffy’s agony as she is literally being driven mad by all the voices in her head. You need to know her life to understand exactly what she means when she says that it, at times, “sucks beyond the telling of it.” And you need to know “Band Candy” to get the hilarity of the references.

I think the ideal gateway episode into a series, especially a cult one, is a mythology-lite episode that showcases the tone of the show. It’s why “Blink” works so well for Doctor Who. It’s creepy to the point of being downright terrifying at times, yet there is minimal Doctor and his mythology in it.

To showcase Buffy's horror and the humor without a dependence on all things Slayer-y, I'd suggest “Out of Mind, Out of Sight” or “Go Fish.” “Hush” is another good choice, but since Buffy is so well-known for the witty dialogue, it fails to be the most powerful introduction.

 

What do you think is the best gateway episode into Buffy?

Posted Tuesday May 7 11pm  8 notes

 
 

herbalsmoothie asked: I also find it disappointing that Leslie is (concretely) planning to have kids now. I think there've been some hints before Partridge that she might want kids; End of the World comes to mind, where she freaks out about Ben's potential future kids. Still, even though they're married now, it would be refreshing to see the show choose a less obvious route for what's next for her. And more than that, baby storylines are often terrible and indicate a lack of better ideas- and now Parks has 2 of them.

(answering this several days late!)

They really do indicate a lack of better ideas and the fact that they’re mushing two into the season makes me wonder where they are planning to take the series. The less said about Ann’s arc the better, and I get that the discussion would come up with Ben and Leslie now that they’re married. You have put much of my issues with the writers taking this tack so perfectly: “Even though they’re married now, it would be refreshing to see the show choose a less obvious route for what’s next for her.”

Parks hasn’t always taken the easy, obvious route for their characters even if things generally do work out for everyone. And for the most part, they have given us fairly unconventional characters that are believable and relatable, that we care about and want to follow them through their journey. I know that Mike Schur’s original plan was to have Leslie go through a number of bad dates/relationships until they developed the Ben Wyatt character* — so they have leanings to go superpredictable but it gives me hope that they respond and react creatively to unexpected changes and chemistry. (After this season, I’m hopeful but not holding my breath.)

 

* “When Greg Daniels and I were designing the show originally, we thought instead of putting Leslie in one significant relationship, we were going to have her date a lot of different people and learn different things from different types of guys. It’s why we introduced Louis CK’s character and Justin Theroux’s character. We wanted her to date guys who were different shapes of wrong for her and learn slowly what kind of man was right for her. And then Adam Scott was cast and we put them on-camera together and we thought, well, we’re not going to beat this.” — Mike Schur on Vulture

Friday Apr 26 4pm  3 notes

 
 

diaphenia:

herbalsmoothie:

hplssrmntc8688:

strange things are afoot @ the circle k: ryeloza replied to your post: I agree with some of this, but I read…

amypop:

ryeloza replied to your post:

I agree with some of this, but I read the more in that line more like wanting to make time for her family (Ben now, and maybe kids later) in addition to her accomplishments, not that she wanted to give up one for the other.

I disagree that the “I want…

Based on Leslie’s love for Parks, children’s concerts and being the caring loving person she is, I think having children is an easy trait to believe in her. However, since Leslie’s dating life was always awful and fleeting, prioritizing the tangibles in her life (friends, waffles and work) made more sense for where her character was at that time. Now that she is married and has had an epiphany that wow, kids are something she can have and seeing first hand how fulfilled Jerry is with his has sparked a desire to have her own. I don’t think if she’d stayed single she may never have focused on it or felt that she was missing that in her life necessarily, but now that it’s within reach what’s so wrong with her deciding she’s ready and wants that in addition to her career? She’s advancing her career and there’s no reason she can’t add another layer to her happiness by having kids. I think it’s a very in character growth arc for Leslie.

Funnily enough, I agree with both you and Amy. I don’t think it’s wildly out of character for Leslie to want kids. I think there might have been hints before (like that End of the World freakout moment), plus there have been no indications to the contrary, and she’s in her mid to late thirties and for maybe the first time (?) in the kind of lasting relationship where it would make sense to talk about having kids.

But I also definitely agree that the phrasing of “Accomplishments are great, but I want more than that” is more than a little unfortunate. I don’t know if it necessarily undermines her whole character, though I also agree that she has been all about accomplishments and wanting to be president up to this point (with a slight detour when she was willing to get herself fired for Ben). But Leslie is impulsive, so the line about accomplishments and the throwaway line “We’re always going to work” could have been said under the temporary influence of the Gergich breakfast and might not indicate a complete sea change. Nevertheless, even though I don’t see it as an irreversible change in the character, I still don’t think it was very well thought out by the writers in terms of the narrative the show usually has re: women and careers. In that sense, it’s somewhat comparable to Leslie calling Ann a “beautiful spinster”, IMO.

Above all, for me, Leslie and Ben having kids is of no interest, not because it doesn’t make any sense for them, but precisely because it makes so much sense. It is the expected narrative: marriage and then kids. If they weren’t thinking about kids, then what else would they be doing? That question, the what else, is far more interesting to me than being fed the easy narrative. I’m not a fan of spouting various and sundry writing “rules”, but in this case I think the following applies: rule of screenwriting—your first idea will probably be too obvious, so think again. The way I see it, this is where the show could mark itself once again as original and fresh, by not picking the easy route on where to go next. But it is, and that’s disappointing.

Agreed on most of this. Not to disparage anyone who has or wants kids— a group that includes most people I’m friends with, and my parents— it’s just frustrating to see yet another female character want kids. Wanting kids is fine, and I’m all for the continuation of the species, and please don’t take anything I’m saying as a slam on those people, but—

It would’ve been nice to see a childfree character. Someone who explicitly told the audience that she didn’t want kids, and then stuck by it. As someone who doesn’t want kids, I’d like to see more of that reflected on screen. And yes, I also get that there are loads of underrepresented groups missing from the media, but this doesn’t have to be an either/or thing. 

Almost twenty percent of women in the US end up childless, either by choice or by circumstance. And yet, in my own media-heavy life, I can only think of two characters (Robin Scherbatsky and Samantha Jones) who purposefully chose not to have children and discuss it on-screen. 

Leslie Knope wanting kids doesn’t seem out-of-character to me, necessarily, I think they left her open-ended enough that either decision would’ve worked for me. More than anything, I want to see the character ultimately be happy.

But I do wish her personal decision that’s brought her happiness could’ve lined up with my personal decision that’s also brought me happiness. 

Reblogging for diaphenia and herbalsmoothie's commentary, especially: 

But I also definitely agree that the phrasing of “Accomplishments are great, but I want more than that” is more than a little unfortunate… I still don’t think it was very well thought out by the writers in terms of the narrative the show usually has re: women and careers. In that sense, it’s somewhat comparable to Leslie calling Ann a “beautiful spinster”, IMO.

Above all, for me, Leslie and Ben having kids is of no interest, not because it doesn’t make any sense for them, but precisely because it makes so much sense. It is the expected narrative: marriage and then kids. If they weren’t thinking about kids, then what else would they be doing? That question, the what else, is far more interesting to me than being fed the easy narrative. I’m not a fan of spouting various and sundry writing “rules”, but in this case I think the following applies: rule of screenwriting—your first idea will probably be too obvious, so think again. The way I see it, this is where the show could mark itself once again as original and fresh, by not picking the easy route on where to go next. But it is, and that’s disappointing.

Tuesday Apr 23 11am  19 notes

 
 

i JUST watched this week’s ep and that scene was SO GOOD! It made me so happy just to have a lady say “i DO NOT WANT KIDS! I am very happy not having kids!”

Plus, the added bonus of it being a character that I adore :)

Amy gets added to the list!

Monday Apr 22 11pm  4 notes

 
 

ryeloza replied to your post: 

I agree with some of this, but I read the more in that line more like wanting to make time for her family (Ben now, and maybe kids later) in addition to her accomplishments, not that she wanted to give up one for the other.

I disagree that the “I want more” is about spending more time with Ben. I totally realize that it sounds like i’m arguing semantics, but to quote the whole scene:

Accomplishments are great, but I want something more. I want what Jerry has. I mean, we’re always going to work but I think we need to fill this scrapbook too. [holds up FAMILY ALBUM scrapbook] Maybe we should take a real day off and talk about starting our family.”

The “more” is in direct relation to “accomplishments,” and then she says that she wants what Jerry has — a partner and several children "Starting our family" just means "starting to have children." 

(And I feel like “we’re always going to work” is completely a throwaway line.)

I feel like if Leslie already had kids and her career wasn’t as successful, she’d be saying it the other way, My family is great, but I want more than that I think it was poor phrasing.

But that is not the character that the show was built around. If this show was about a mother who had kids and didn’t feel like she had a successful career and wanted to get involved in politics/government, it would be a completely different situation. 

ashisfriendly replied to your post: 

But hasn’t Leslie talked about their future children before? I know that a bfast at Jerrys to switch her is hard to believe but she’s talked about it before just not DEEP.

herbalsmoothie pointed out that Leslie mentioned Ben’s future kids in “End of the World,” but I really don’t recall her talking about wanting/having kids herself until “Partridge.” I’m not saying that she hadn’t, I just don’t remember any examples.

Monday Apr 22 11pm  19 notes

 
 

kyrie-anne asked: I've loved your recent posts re: the portrayal of women and motherhood. I totally see how "Accomplishments are great but I want more than that," and that scene perpetuates the motherhood narrative, but I wonder if there is another way to read the line. Can you see - in the pathos of the show - the idea that the people in your life matter more than accomplishments? I'm thinking of the line "Waffles. Friends. Work." I think the line fits inside a larger argument the show is making. Am I crazy?

Thank you! The whole “all women want to be mothers” narrative is something I’ve been looking at critically for a long time and I’m especially fascinated by how it’s perpetuated and portrayed in the media. 

I completely agree with you that the line CAN be taken in to mean that we are more than our accomplishments. However, in this case, she says it SPECIFICALLY in the context of having a baby. “Accomplishments are great but I want more than that… Maybe we should take a real day off and talk about starting our family.” If the context was “I want to take time off and travel around the world” or “I’ve decided that I no longer want to be President and instead I want to work on X project in Pawnee to make life better for everyone,” I’d fully be on board with your suggestion of the line. 

Also — this is Leslie Knope, who was so excited that she got her first subcommittee before she was 34 and is determined to be the President of the United States. One breakfast with the Gergich family undid her lifelong ambition and drive for those accomplishments? Is that an emotional arc that is true to the character — that in ONE moment, everything that has defined and excited her about everything she can and will do in life has been relegated to “yeah, they’re nice and all, but they’re nothing compared to having babies!” I don’t think so, and in a way, I think that’s what bothers me the most about this declaration.

What I would LOVE is if Leslie and Ben actually do have a talk and decide that they don’t need to have babies to be a family. That they can be an amazing family with just the two of them. That would be awesome but I HIGHLY doubt Parks would do it. 

Has that ever been shown on TV? A couple talking about it and making the decision together not to have kids? I can’t think of any examples right now — it seems like in most cases, one person wants kids and the other doesn’t and it is a constant underlying tension that erupts into huge fights from time to time. But a coherent, respectful conversation in which two people decide that they don’t want to be parents? Oh, hell no. 

Monday Apr 22 10pm  6 notes

 
 
 
 
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